Tag Archive | newbery award

Navigating Early

I have been eagerly awaiting Clare Vanderpool’s follow up novel to her Newbery Award winning novel, Moon Over Manifest.  Let me tell you that Navigating Early was well worth the wait!

ImageAfter his mother’s death at the end of World War II, Jack Baker is suddenly uprooted from his home in Kansas and placed in a boys’ boarding school in Maine.  There he meets Early Auden, the strangest of boys, who reads the number pi as an unending story and collects clippings about sightings of a black bear in the nearby mountains.  Feeling lost and adrift, Jack can’t help being drawn to Early, who refuses to believe what everyone accepts to be the truth about the great Appalachian bear, timber rattlesnakes, and the legendary school hero known as the Fish, who was lost in the war.  When Jack and Early find themselves alone at school, they set out for the Appalachian Trail on a quest for the great black bear.  Along the way, they meet some truly strange characters, several of them dangerous, all lost in some way, and each a part of the pi story Early continues to reveal.  Jack’s ability to be a steadfast friend to Early will be tested as the boys discover things they never knew about themselves and others.

Navigating Early makes the reader feel as if he/she is walking around in all directions trying to find something to hold on to in the story, something to help make sense of it all…just like the characters.  I believe that in Early Auden, Vanderpool has given us a character for the ages who will be remembered in the world of children’s literature for many years to come.  Navigating Early is a pleasant surprise that will delight many readers of different ages.  I am quite confidant that with this new novel Vanderpool is navigating her way to a second Newbery Award.Image

 

The Mighty Miss Malone

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I was so excited when I saw this gem sitting on the new book shelf at work!  I am a huge fan of Christopher Paul Curtis’ work, and I couldn’t wait to dig into another chunk of history with him.  Curtis has a way of bringing the time period he is writing about to life for his readers.  His characters are more than just “people on a page,” they feel like friends.  This book centers around the character of Deza Malone, or as her Daddy calls her “Darling Daughter Deza.”

We readers have met Deza before in Curtis’ Newbery Award winning novel Bud, Not Buddy.  In this new book, The Mighty Miss Malone, we have the pleasure of seeing what her life was like as a child, and also of meeting her family…the Malone family of Gary, Indiana.
Twelve-year-old Deza Malone is the smartest student in her class, told by her teachers that she’s destined for a special path in life.  Her older brother, Jimmie, is no angel, but he can sing like one, and when he does, people stop to listen.  The Great Depression has hit Gary hard, and there are few jobs–especially for black men like Mr. Malone.  After their father leaves Gary to find work, Deza, Jimmie, and their mother set out in his wake, always holding out hope that they will catch up to him.”  The characters they meet along the way, the hardships they endure as individuals and a family, will make you cheer for this endearing young lady.  As Deza and her family always say, “Kisses…kisses…kisses make you stronger.”

Here is one of my favorite quotes from the book…and it only gets better from there!
Pg.3
“Once upon a time…”  If I could get away with it, that’s how I’d begin every essay I write.  Those are the four best words to use when you start telling about yourself because anything that begins that way always, always finishes with another four words,”…and they lived happily everafter.”  An that’s a good ending for any story.”
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The One and Only Ivan

ImageOne good thing about being laid up with a bad back is that I am able to read, read, read.  One good thing about being able to read is that once in a while you come upon a gem of a book, a story that is deserving of a little extra attention.  I was lucky enough to stumble upon just such a book this week…it’s called The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate.  According to the book jacket at the back of the book, Katherine was inspired to write The One and Only Ivan after reading a story about the real Ivan.  The real Ivan is a western lowland gorilla who lived alone in a tiny cage for twenty-seven years before being moved to a zoo in Atlanta after a public outcry.  The special thing about Ivan is that he’s an artist.  He is well known for his paintings, which he “signs” with his thumbprint.

In the story of The One and Only Ivan, “Ivan is an easygoing gorilla.  Living at the Exit 8 Big Top Mall and Video Arcade, he has grown accustomed to humans watching him through the glass walls of his domain.  He rarely misses his life in the jungle.  In fact, he hardly ever thinks about it at all.  Instead, Ivan thinks about TV shows he’s seen and about his friends Stella, an elderly elephant, and Bob, a stray dog.  But mostly Ivan thinks about art and how to capture the taste of a mango or the sound of leaves with color and a well-placed line.  Then he meets Ruby, a baby elephant taken from her family, and she makes Ivan see their home–and his own art–through new eyes.  When Ruby arrives, change comes with her, and it’s up to Ivan to make it a change for the better.

This story made me laugh, weep, think and most importantly feel.  I know I am going to recommend it to as many children as possible at the library…that will be my way of giving it a little “extra” attention.  The world of children’s literature has given this book a lot of “extra” attention too…this past Monday, The One and Only Ivan was honored by being awarded the “one and only” Newbery Medal!  It doesn’t get any better than that!

ImageHere are a few quotes from the book that I absolutely loved…

Pg. 23  “My visitors are often surprised when they see the TV Mack put in my domain.  They seem to find it odd, the sight of a gorilla staring at tiny humans in a box.  Sometimes I wonder, though: Isn’t the way they stare at me, sitting in my tiny box, just as strange?”—Ivan.

Pg. 51  “Gorillas are not complainers.  We’re dreamers, poets, philosophers, nap takers.”—Ivan.

Pg. 114  “Before Mack, before Bob, even before Ruby, I know Stella is gone.  I know it the way you know that summer is over and winter is on the way.  I just know.  Stella once teased me that elephants are superior because they feel more joy and more grief than apes.  ‘Your gorilla hearts are made of ice, Ivan,’ she said, her eyes glittering.  ‘Ours are made of fire.’  Right now I would give all the yogurt raisins in all the world for a heart made of ice.”—Ivan.

Pg. 131  “Every weekend, Mack and Helen took me in their convertible to a fast-food restaurant, where they ordered me french fries and a strawberry shake.  Mack loved to see the expression on the cashier’s face when he drove up and said, ‘could I have some extra ketchup for my kid?’—Ivan.

Pg. 287  “Is there anything sweeter than the touch of another as she pulls a dead bug from your fur?”—Ivan.

Moon Over Manifest

I put my hand on his shoulder.  “That was a good service, Shady.”
“It was,” he agreed, but didn’t say more.
“Seems like everyone in this town’s got a story to tell.”
Shady nodded.  “I believe you’re right about that.  The Lord himself knew the power of a good story.  How it can reach out and wrap around a person like a warm blanket.”

And that is just what Clare Vanderpool’s story, Moon Over Manifest, does.  It wraps around you like a warm blanket.  The characters, the town, and most of all the writing just keeps you wanting more.  You are literally transported back to those lazy summer days when the heat and sun just forced you to move slower…do more thinking.  I really loved this book!  It is definitely worthy of the 2011 Newbery Award, and I am looking forward to more from this new author.  Here is a quick synopsis of the book…

“Abilene Tucker feels abandoned. Her father has put her on a train, sending her off to live with an old friend for the summer while he works a railroad job. Armed only with a few possessions and her list of universals, Abilene jumps off the train in Manifest, Kansas, aiming to learn about the boy her father once was.

Having heard stories about Manifest, Abilene is disappointed to find that it’s just a worn-out old town. But her disappointment quickly turns to excitement when she discovers a hidden cigar box full of mementos, including some old letters that mention a spy known as the Rattler. These mysterious letters send Abilene and her new friends Lettie and Ruthanne, on an honest-to-goodness spy hunt, even though they are warned to “Leave Well Enough Alone.”

Abilene throws caution aside when she heads down the mysterious Path to Perdition to pay a debt to the reclusive Miss Sadie, a diviner who only tells stories from the past. It seems that Manifest’s history is full of colorful and shadowy characters–and long held secrets. And as those secrets are laid bare one by one, Abilene begins to weave her own story into the fabric of the town.”